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Home » What's New » Helping Lazy Eyes Get Active

Helping Lazy Eyes Get Active

Lazy eyes are pretty common, and are also not difficult to treat. Amblyopia comes about when vision is suppressed, but only in one eye. Vision might be suppressed if a child isn't able to see well through one eye because of issues with distance vision, and in some cases, astigmatism. In most cases, eye patches are the central and most productive part of remedying lazy eyes. Our patients are advised to have their patch on for a few hours each day, and in most cases, the patients will need corrective glasses as well. But how does wearing a patch actually work? Basically, employing the use of a patch encourages your child's brain to better communicate with the weaker eye, and over time, strengthen it.

Often, parents have trouble fitting their kids with eye patches, especially when they're on the younger side. Their more active eye is patched, which restricts their ability to see. It can be tricky to justify the patch to a young child; that they need to wear the patch to help the eyesight in their weaker eye, but that weak eyesight is exactly what makes patching so difficult. There are a number of ways to help your kids keep their patch on. Using a reward system with stickers given when the patch is worn can be great for some kids. Patch manufacturers sympathize with your plight; patches are available in lots of kid-friendly colors and patterns. Make it an activity by giving them the opportunity to choose a different patch each day. Older kids will be able to intellectualize the patching process, so it's worthwhile to sit and talk to them about it.

Another trick some parents have found success with is also putting an eye patch on their child's favorite doll or stuffed animal.

A good result needs your child's assistance and your ability to stay focused on the long-term goal of recovering good vision in your child's weaker eye.

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